As climate change impacts cities across the world, creating resilient communities and buildings is more important than ever before. Check out our resources below on resiliency.

The Latest

Why Building Codes Make Our Cities and Communities More Resilient

The number, frequency, and intensity of disasters affecting U.S. cities is growing. From floods and fires to sub-zero cold snaps and extreme heat, it seems like every week we are provided with another example of why communities need more tools to ensure they are more resilient, prepared for weather-related disruptions, and can quickly recover. The … Continued

Museums Embrace Resiliency

Whether they are historic landmarks or contemporary icons, museums often serve as engines of economic regeneration.

IMT 2016 Annual Report Case Study: Economic Growth

By focusing on the top user of energy in the U.S.—buildings—IMT strives to help people save money, increase property value and make buildings more affordable, drive economic growth, reduce harmful pollution and tackle climate change, and live and work in healthy, resilient cities. Our progress on this work is captured in an interactive 2016 Annual … Continued

IMT 2016 Annual Report Case Study: Creating Win-Win Solutions

By focusing on the top user of energy in the U.S.—buildings—IMT strives to help people save money, increase property value and make buildings more affordable, drive economic growth, reduce harmful pollution and tackle climate change, and live and work in healthy, resilient cities. Our progress on this work is captured in an interactive 2016 Annual … Continued

Do Energy Codes Work?

Preliminary results from the largest residential energy code field study ever conducted.

Building Energy Codes: Creating Safe, Resilient, and Energy-Efficient Homes

Building energy codes establish minimum requirements for the elements within a building that impact energy consumption. The obvious benefit of buying a new home built in compliance with current energy codes is the energy cost savings for the homeowner. However, there are other significant benefits that come with the purchase of a home built in … Continued

How Energy Codes Make Commercial Buildings More Efficient

How would a (hypothetical) four-story, 50,000-square-foot office building built to meet the 2001 energy code differ from an identical building that meets the 2010 code? It would be 41 percent more energy-efficient, for one thing. Find out more by downloading our new infographic, produced in collaboration with the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub (EEB Hub).